dislocations



Reblogged from vintageanchorbooks
vintageanchor:

“Think you’re escaping and run into yourself. Longest way round is the shortest way home.”  ― James Joyce, Ulysses  Irish novelist and poet James Augustine Aloysius Joyce was born on 2 February 1882 to John Stanislaus Joyce and Mary Jane “May” Murray in the Dublin suburb of Rathgar. Author of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1914), Ulysses (1922) — which was banned in the U.S until a court decision in its favour in 1933, and Finnegan’s Wake (1939).

vintageanchor:

“Think you’re escaping and run into yourself. Longest way round is the shortest way home.”
James Joyce, Ulysses

Irish novelist and poet James Augustine Aloysius Joyce was born on 2 February 1882 to John Stanislaus Joyce and Mary Jane “May” Murray in the Dublin suburb of Rathgar. Author of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1914), Ulysses (1922) — which was banned in the U.S until a court decision in its favour in 1933, and Finnegan’s Wake (1939).

Reblogged from platea-deactivated20130228

momatalks:

platea:

Little Drawings by Dilşad Aladağ

Another way of capturing life…new perspectives of moments in time.

(via momatalks)

Reblogged from longreads
Reblogged from septagonstudios
Reblogged from iamaltlit

79.9 :: ‘taipei’ by tao lin

iamaltlit:

image

‘taipei’ by tao lin // vintage contemporaries, 2013

79.9

review by josh s.

***ed note: more ‘i am alt lit’ contributors will read this book, will probably concentrate on different elements, etc. thankks.***

read this book & fell asleep approx. 2-3x

read this book & ate gyros approx 1-2x

read this book & ate a hamburger i made myself 1x

read this book & spilled water on it 2x

read this book at lunch approx. 4x

read this book at home approx. the rest of the times

read this book & alternated b/w don delillo’s ‘underworld’

//

Read More

Reblogged from thee-efflux
thee-efflux:

Hannah Hoch, Cut with the Kitchen Knife Through the Last Weimar Beer-Belly Cultural Epoch in Germany, 1919.
Favorite part: the chancellor excreting the dada-ists.

thee-efflux:

Hannah Hoch, Cut with the Kitchen Knife Through the Last Weimar Beer-Belly Cultural Epoch in Germany, 1919.

Favorite part: the chancellor excreting the dada-ists.

Reblogged from thee-efflux
thee-efflux:

Hannah Hoch, Beautiful Girl, 1920.

thee-efflux:

Hannah Hoch, Beautiful Girl, 1920.

Reblogged from roger-sterlings-lsd-trip

roger-sterlings-lsd-trip:

The handclaps?  Fucking perfect.

Something about the territory and all those ideo[wah-wah-wait-for-it]grams

Reblogged from therumpus
therumpus:


You’re so used to this kind of smoothness in writing, this feeling that you, the reader, or you, the writer, are this great empathic, wondrous soul. I would love to be that, but of course when we see the way we behave in the world really to other people, we’re confronted with a different version of who we are. Not just this wonderful, tolerant, broad person who sees humanity and everything, but someone a little more narrow, self-defended, sometimes cruel, sometimes selfish. I wanted to try and show that. And also, someone who—people who live in a city, who are able to switch off these famous values of empathy and tolerance and love quite suddenly when you need to. Or if you need to. I wanted to be honest about that experience, but it’s not something you want reflected back at you perhaps, it’s not a pleasure. But reading can be many things: sometimes it can be a pleasure, sometimes it’s a bit tougher. It’s a broad church that way.

What? THE RUMPUS INTERVIEW WITH ZADIE SMITH? Why yes. Yes.

therumpus:

You’re so used to this kind of smoothness in writing, this feeling that you, the reader, or you, the writer, are this great empathic, wondrous soul. I would love to be that, but of course when we see the way we behave in the world really to other people, we’re confronted with a different version of who we are. Not just this wonderful, tolerant, broad person who sees humanity and everything, but someone a little more narrow, self-defended, sometimes cruel, sometimes selfish. I wanted to try and show that. And also, someone who—people who live in a city, who are able to switch off these famous values of empathy and tolerance and love quite suddenly when you need to. Or if you need to. I wanted to be honest about that experience, but it’s not something you want reflected back at you perhaps, it’s not a pleasure. But reading can be many things: sometimes it can be a pleasure, sometimes it’s a bit tougher. It’s a broad church that way.

What? THE RUMPUS INTERVIEW WITH ZADIE SMITH? Why yes. Yes.

(via powells)

Reblogged from thee-efflux
thee-efflux:

Yves Klein,Anthropometries Series, 1960.

thee-efflux:

Yves Klein,Anthropometries Series, 1960.